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Emergency Supplies


There are seven categories of Emergency Supplies to use to create your own kits, or complete the kits you already have.  Check out our selection today!
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Emergency Supplies including First Aid Kits



One bright sunny day on a three mile Girl Scout hike, a gust of wind blew sand into my contacts. Instantly I was in pain. My hands were dirty. I had emptied my water bottle. I didn't know what to do.



Emergencies come at odd times in many unexpected ways and we are often missing the simple emergency supplies that would make life easier. This one had a good ending. A friend came to my rescue with her contact case blessedly filled with solution. I dripped a little on my fingers to clean them off and got the contacts out of my eyes and into her case. I was grateful for someone who thought ahead and was prepared.



In this section you will find many emergency supplies that will be useful when you need them. Here a a few of my favorites:



We carry Potassium Iodide Pills for thyroid blockage in radiation emergencies which are split for children and adults. The World Health Organization tells us that our thyroid collects Radioactive Iodine when a power plant explodes or a bomb goes off, which increases our chance of getting thyroid cancer. If we take Potassium Iodide within the first four hours it blocks the Radioactive Iodine and protects us. Emergency officials are supposed to tell us when and how much we need, but it would be hard to distribute quickly enough, so we should have them  our own emergency supplies.



I have been intrigued with Wise Fire. It is made of small lightweight pellets that are non-toxic, to store, burn, and dispose of.  They are lightweight to carry and safe to have around food. They catch fire easily and stay burning even in the wind and the rain but can be quickly extinguished by removing the oxygen supply. I would like to have them in my emergency supplies.  



On youtube.com, the PaleoHikerMD turned Wise Fire into a wonderful fire starter. He carried a small quantity in a small metal Sucrets Can with a flip on lid. After lighting the pellets using several methods, he used them to ignite tinder and then closed his can, extinguishing his pellets and building his other fire with more twigs. He can repeat this many times, because even a small quantity of Wise Fire burns for twenty or thirty minutes. He noted that it burns at a lower temperature than many other fuels, which can be a good safety feature, but annoying if you are in a hurry to boil your water for instance. I like to use it as a heat source in my Volcano Oven to boil my water and cook my food. The enclosed space in the Volcano Oven conserves heat to allow the water to boil more quickly.



As a Grandmother who serves quite a number of grandchildren and their friends, my heart jumps at the big 3 Shelf First Aid Kit. We have needed nearly everything in it over the years and usually we had to buy things separately and in haste. And afterwards I didn't have a good place to keep the leftover emergency supplies clean and usable for another occasion. The last place I worked had a kit like that hooked to the wall by the floor manager's desk, where we all could find it quickly. Probably having a large, easy to get to First Aid Kit is mandated by law but I was glad it was there.